Professor Catherine Merridale

Professor of Contemporary History

Location Arts Two 3.04

Email: c.merridale@qmul.ac.uk

I read history at King’s College, Cambridge in the 1980s, and then took a PhD at the University of Birmingham just as the Soviet Union was beginning to unravel.  It was an exciting time to be a student in Moscow, and the fast-moving context of Russian politics has continued to inspire my research and teaching ever since.

Research 

I focus on the social, political and cultural history of Russia, with a special interest in the modern period.  I was a pioneer of oral history in Russia, and my work continues to be wide-ranging and inter-disciplinary.  Although I focus on the twentieth century, my recent research, which is a history of the Kremlin, covers the entire span of Russian history since 988.  Broadly speaking, my research interests include:

  • violence, war, and the history of trauma
  • oral history and memory
  • the social and cultural history of places
  • the creation and role of historical myths and paradigms
  • the interactions between high-level political change and everyday life

Undergraduate teaching

Postgraduate supervision 

I welcome applications from candidates interested in

  • violence, war, and the history of trauma
  • oral history and memory
  • the social and cultural history of places
  • the creation and role of historical myths and paradigms
  • the interactions between high-level political change and everyday life

Publications 

Books

Forthcoming
  • Red Fortress: The Kremlin in Russian History.  Forthcoming 2013 in the UK (Penguin Allen Lane) and the Netherlands (Nieuw Amsterdam); forthcoming 2014 in the USA (Metropolitan Books) and in Germany (Fischer verlag). 

Edited Journal

 

Academic Journal Papers (refereed)
  • 'The Reluctant Opposition: The Right "Deviation" in Moscow, 1928', Soviet Studies, vol xli, July 1989, pp. 382-400.
  • 'The Moscow Party and the Socialist Offensive: Activists and Workers, 1928-1931' in Stephen White (ed.), New Directions in Soviet History (refereed series, Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 125-140.
  • 'Language, Patronage and the Creation of Historical Paradigm', Common Security Forum Papers, Spring 1995 (refereed occasional series, 32 pp.).
  • 'Death, Mourning and Mortality in the Soviet Union, 1917-1945', Common Security Forum Papers, Summer 1995 (refereed occasional series, 28 pp.)
  • 'The USSR Population Census of 1937 and the Limits of Stalinist Rule', Historical Journal,  vol. 39, no. 1, March 1996, pp. 225-240.
  • 'Death, Memory and Mourning in Russia', History Workshop Journal, issue 42, October 1996, pp. 1-18.
  • 'English-language History and the Creation of Historical Paradigm', History of the Human Sciences, vol. 9, no. 4, December 1996, pp. 81-98.
  • 'Yazyk, patronazh i sozdaniya istoricheskoi paradigmy', Acta Evrasica, no.
  • 1-2 (4-5), 1998,  pp. 32-54.
  • 'The Collective Mind: Trauma and Shell-shock in Twentieth-Century Russia', Journal of Contemporary History, vol. 35, no. 1, January 2000, pp. 39-55.
  • ‘Redesigning History in Contemporary Russia’, Journal of Contemporary History, vol. 38, no. 1, January 2003, pp. 13-28
  • ‘Revolution among the Dead: Cemeteries in Twentieth-Century Russia’, Mortality, vol. 8, no. 2,  May 2003, pp. 176-188.
  • ‘Culture, Ideology and Combat in the Red Army, 1939-1945’, Journal of Contemporary History, 41:2, April 2006, pp. 305-324
  • ‘The Red Army: Did Gender Matter?’, Journal of War and Culture Studies, forthcoming 2013.

Chapters in books

 

 

Accolades

Membership of professional associations or societies 

Editorial Positions 

Appearances in the media

Radio

I have made a number of feature programmes for BBC Radio, as well as taking part in scheduled network Radio programmes.  Among the most relevant are:

Television

Contributor to In Europa (Dutch TV series, ed Geert Mak, 2007)